Driving in Greenbriar (It’s Not a Racetrack)

http://egreenbriar.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/greenbriar_flyer_2013_12.pdf

The article I sent to Greenbriar Flyer:

Greenbriar Speed Limit is 25!
by Angela D. Glascock
Accidents and near misses can turn into tragedy in an instant. As
a community, we are quick to come together to provide support when
there is a tragedy. We send our condolences, put on fundraisers, gather
our unwanted clothes to donate or collect food, water and toiletries for
those who suddenly have nothing. Let’s do something different and
come together to take action
before
there is a tragedy.
What I’m talking about is something we can control. It’s not a
tornado, hurricane or other natural disaster. I am talking about us as a
community and the way we drive through the neighborhood. We have
control over how we drive. It’s a disaster waiting to happen.
If you are a teenager, of college age, or in your mid-20s to 100, this
applies to you. You are in control here. You can choose to drive safely.
That doesn’t mean drive boring. Just pay attention and obey the simple
laws and rules of the road.
I understand that people are in a hurry and have other things on
their minds while driving. But think about this: What happens when you plow down someone’s kid because
you were speeding, distracted or making an illegal U-turn? I’ll tell you what happens. You’ve hurt or killed
someone. This, in turn, affects the victim’s family and friends. Then, there’s you. You’re going to get jail time.
And nobody will like or respect you — in jail or out.
I enjoy living in Greenbriar. I grew
up here and lived here most of my life.
My parents have lived in Greenbriar
for 26 years. Before that, we lived in
Brookfield.
I’ve seen a lot of changes and
have experienced a lot of change. I’ve
gone from scrawling “Society Sucks!”
with a big black marker on a marble
composition book as a teen to shouting
at people driving too fast down the
street as an adult. I have become part
of a community, and I was part of that
community even when I was a sulky,
angst-ridden teen.

The article I meant to send to Greenbriar Flyer:

Driving In Greenbriar. It’s Not a Racetrack!

by Angela D. Glascock

As a community, we are quick to come together to provide support when there is a tragedy. We send our condolences, put on fundraisers, gather our unwanted clothes to donate, or collect food, water, and toiletries for those who suddenly have nothing.

Car accidents and near-misses are mishaps that can turn into tragedy in an instant. However, unlike a tornado, hurricane, or other natural disaster, car accidents are primarily human-made disasters—but the way we drive is something we can control.

Let’s all do something different and come together and take action before there is a tragedy.

Regardless of your driving age, you are in control of your vehicle and the way you drive. You can choose to drive safely. Just pay attention and obey the laws and rules of the road.

It doesn’t matter where you are driving in Greenbriar. The speed limit is 25 miles per hour. There has been more than one occasion when I have seen people driving down Point Pleasant at close to 50 miles per hour. In fact, it happens about once or twice a week. Always at the same time, the same cars.

On Halloween, there were some kids speeding by and my friend waved at them to slow down. And they did slow down—long enough to roll down the window and say to my friend, “Yes?,” then when she said, “Slow down!,” they said “No, thanks!” and sped off. They zoomed down the road while kids were out trick-or-treating, then proceeded to zip around a car that was stopped.

About a month ago, while a friend and I were out for an early morning walk, we started across Middle Ridge. We were nearly to the curb when a man came speeding toward the stop sign on Point Pleasant in front of the pool and GBE. He paused at the stop sign then turned toward us. He was about to hit us when I grabbed my friend and yelped as we jumped out of the way. It took him a second, then he realized that he not only almost hit pedestrians in a crosswalk, but he had turned into the oncoming traffic lane (which didn’t have traffic at the time). He didn’t wave an aplogy or anything. Just continued on his way in his Volkswagen.

I find this neighborhood speeding problem ridiculous. There is no reason for it except stupidity and ignorance. It’s not just teens and young adults speeding, either, so don’t try to only blame them. I see people of all ages. I am shocked when they fly past my house, because we are not even in a section that goes anywhere. If you are on my part of the street, you are almost home. I’m pretty sure most of the people who use Greenbriar as a cut-through don’t care if they speed or not, but if it’s your own neighborhood where you know there are kids and pets out? I’ve gotten to the point where I am hesitant to let my kids play in the front yard because of the inconsiderate people who go zooming down the road might lose control of their car and end up in our yard. Why not? It’s happened to my parents not once, but twice—and they live in the neighborhood as well, at the end of Melville.

I understand that people are in a hurry and have other things on their minds while driving. But think about this: What happens when you plow down someone’s kid because you were speeding/distracted/making illegal U-turns? I’ll tell you what happens. You’ve hurt or killed someone. This in turn affects the victim’s family and friends. Then there’s you. You’re going to get jail time. And nobody will like or respect you—in jail or out. At the very least you would get caught for speeding and get a ticket. The way I’ve seen some people exceed the speed limit here, I’m pretty sure if they got busted they would get reckless driving and have their license yanked then and there.

So, people who drive in Greenbriar (or any neighborhood!), please consider those who live in the neighborhood, the law, and yourselves, and obey the speed limit. I can pretty much guarantee THAT won’t kill you.

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